UEFA Qualification U21


Bosnia & Herzegovina U21
Bosnia & Herzegovina U21
15:00 Moldova U21
Moldova U21
Moldova U21

Andorra U21
Andorra U21
17:30 Albania U21
Albania U21
Albania U21

UEFA Championship U19 - International Youth Tournaments


Croatia U19
13:00
Norway U19

Hungary U19
Hungary U19
13:00
Germany U19

Belgium U19
Belgium U19
14:00 Ukraine U19
Ukraine U19
Ukraine U19

Czech Republic U19
Czech Republic U19
14:00 Greece U19
Greece U19
Greece U19

Denmark U19
14:00 England U19
England U19
England U19

Israel U19
Israel U19
14:00
France U19

Poland U19
Poland U19
14:00 Switzerland U19
Switzerland U19
Switzerland U19

Romania U19
Romania U19
14:00
Azerbaijan U19

Russia U19
Russia U19
14:00 Republic of Ireland U19
Republic of Ireland U19
Republic of Ireland U19

Serbia U19
Serbia U19
14:00 Italy U19
Italy U19
Italy U19

Cyprus U19
Cyprus U19
16:15 Turkey U19
Turkey U19
Turkey U19

Scotland U19
Scotland U19
16:15 Portugal U19
Portugal U19
Portugal U19

Netherlands U19
18:00 Spain U19
Spain U19
Spain U19

Slovenia U19
18:00
Wales U19

FFA Cup - Australia


Annerley FC
9:30
University of Queensland

2. Liga - Slovakia


FK Dukla Banská Bystrica
14:00
FC Lokomotíva Košice

AFC Championship U23 - International Youth Tournaments


North Korea U23
5:00
Hong Kong U23

Timor Leste U23
8:30
Macau U23

Singapore U23
9:00
Mongolia U23

Indonesia U23
10:00
Brunei Darussalam U23

South Korea U23
10:00
Australia U23

Turkmenistan U23
11:15
Yemen U23

Japan U23
11:30
Myanmar U23

Uzbekistan U23
12:00
Tajikistan U23

Malaysia U23
12:45
China U23

Bangladesh U23
13:00
Sri Lanka U23

Vietnam U23
13:00
Thailand U23

Cambodia U23
13:00
Chinese Taipei U23

Iraq U23
14:15
Iran U23

Jordan U23
14:15
Syria U23

Lebanon U23
14:25
Maldives U23

Nepal U23
16:00
Afghanistan U23

Palestine U23
16:00
Bahrain U23

Qatar U23
16:00
Oman U23

Kyrgyzstan U23
17:15
Kuwait U23

Saudi Arabia U23
17:25
United Arab Emirates U23

CAF Championship U23 - International Youth Tournaments


Kenya U23
13:00
Sudan U23

Zimbabwe U23
13:00
Mozambique U23

Formula 1 Live Streams 

Whether you're a fan of F1 on its own or someone that enjoys a few bets on the sport, the advent of live streams has opened things up massively. By powering up your desktop or mobile device you can now gain access to all the action courtesy of live HD streams. From the qualifying rounds to the race itself, every wheel spin, collision and victory lap is now available online.
 
For casual fans this is great because it means you can now stay in touch with the action without interrupting your weekend. Indeed, by simply accessing one of PlayLiveStream's live Formula 1 streams via your mobile you can keep tabs on a race whilst on the go.
 
In contrast, if you're a hardcore fan who wants to see more action or become a more profitable sports bettor, then these streams put you right alongside the driver at all times. One of the biggest weapons a sports bettor can use against the bookmaker is knowledge and the more information you have access to, the better. Live F1 streams provide this flow of information and, therefore, make it much easier for punters of all persuasions to make money and engage with the sport they love.
 
 
 

Playlivestream F1

 
For those that enjoy their sport with a spoonful of speed and an element of danger, Formula 1 (F1) is the obvious choice. Around since the fifties and spawning a plethora of legends since that time, Formula 1 has evolved into the ultimate car racing spectacle.
 
Although other racing organisations such as NASCAR or the World Rally Championship have their appeal, none can compete with Formula 1 in terms of popularity, prestige and global exposure. In fact, thanks to its associations with some of the largest brands in the world, Formula 1 is arguably the richest of all sports.
 
Indeed, it's thanks to this popularity among major companies and international spectators that Formula 1 is now broadcast around the world on hundreds of TV channels. However, as comprehensive as TV coverage has been over the years, Formula 1 is now entering a new era thanks to live streaming. Today, when you log into PlayLiveStream, you'll find a slew of Formula 1 streams every week of the season.
 
Designed to give you up close and personal access to all the latest racing antics via your desktop or mobile device, these HD streams have opened up the sport in a way not previously seen and are helping to make it an even more popular event than it once was.
 

The History of Formula 1: From the Fifties to Today 

Formula 1 is the highest class of single seat auto racing in the world and it's been that way ever since it was established in 1950. With cars beginning to evolve and a growing desire to see them pitted against each other in a high octane race, the original founders of Formula 1 wanted to codify a set of rules that would see the fastest cars and fastest drivers all compete in an elite organisation.
 
Following the success of the European Grand Prix Motor Racing in the 1920s and 1930s, Formula 1 officials drew up a set of conditions which cars and drivers had to meet ready for the launch of the sport after World War II.
 
Wanting to ensure that cars were different enough from road cars to make them more dynamic, yet still conventional enough that spectators could appreciate the skill it took to drive one, the owners of Formula 1 launched the first official race at Silverstone, England, in 1950. Attracting car manufactures and drivers from all over the world, the event proved to be a huge success and at the close of the inaugural season Giuseppe Farina and Alfa Romeo were declared the champions.
 
Since then the sport has evolved immensely and as new technology hits the market, so does the scope for better cars, faster times and more exciting races increases. Although recent years have seen F1 bosses implement rules that push for safer driving conditions, the sport is still seen as a potentially dangerous endeavour and one that very few people could thrive in.
 

Formula 1's Top Five Circuits 

Technically known as circuits, the best Formula 1 tracks are those that encompass a subtle blend of speed, precision and unpredictability. Not only that, but given F1's history of commercial enterprise, the leading tracks have also become landmarks for many regions and as such the level of infrastructure surrounding them has grown immensely in recent years.
 
Typically, an F1 circuit will involve a mixture of tight bends, sweeping corners and long straights all designed to test a driver's coordination and reactions as well as a car's speed and agility. Although some circuits are used for other purposes, many of the leading tracks have purposely built complexes worth hundreds of millions specifically for elite racing.
 
Silverstone, England: The birthplace of Formula 1, Silverstone is a home to a slew of racing events including the FIA World Endurance Championship, the European Le Mans Series and Formula 3000. Essentially the home of British racing, this 3.66 mile course comprises of 18 turns and is one of the leading tracks in the world according to F1 experts.
 
Circuit de Monaco, France: One of the original Formula 1 street circuits, Monaco is only 2.07 miles long but thanks to its long sweeping corners and flowing straights, it's one of the most exciting stops on the annual calendar. However, given that circuit is made up of actual roads, the element of danger is extremely high in this race; a fact which is compounded by two extremely tight hairpin turns at either end of the track.
 
Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Australia: Located just south of central Melbourne around the Albert Park area, this circuit is another street racing spectacular that takes place over 3.12 miles. After being opened in 1953, the track was then closed for a brief period before being re-opened in 1996. Thanks to this refurbishment, Melbourne is known as one of the smoothest street circuits in the world.
 
Monza, Italy: The Italians have always had a passion for cars and motor racing and that's the reason Monza is regarded as one of the most prestigious F1 circuits in the world. In between the country's racing heritage and thousands of passionate fans, the Autodromo Nazionale Monza is one of the most classically designed racing circuits. 3.60 miles long with a combination of long straights, sharp bends and sweeping turns, this track has been producing races of the highest quality since 1921.
 
Hockenheimring, Germany: A long serving member of the F1 community, Germany's Hockenheimring is arguably one of the most testing circuits in the world. The original track was opened in 1932 and served as that site for many Formula 1 events. However, in 2002 the circuit had to be redesigned to comply with F1 rules. Wanting the track length to be reduced from 4.24 miles to below 3 miles, the designers reconfigured the track to span 2.84 miles and encompass 17 turns.  
 

Betting on Formula 1: Know Your Drivers and Circuits 

Given Formula 1's status as a global sport, the range of betting opportunities for punters of all persuasions is huge. Indeed, because different circuits provide different tests for every driver, the outcome of a race is never certain and that makes betting on F1 extremely engaging.
 
Unfortunately, however, it also makes it a tough proposition to beat unless you follow some form of strategy. The first thing you need to think about when you're speculating on a major race is the starting grid. If you're looking to put your money on a driver you think will win the race, you need to scan the grid to find a driver that's both in-form and high up in the starting order. This will put you in pole position prior to the green light when it comes to your chances of winning.
 
In some races in particular this will prove to be significant, because there may be very little scope for overtaking. This means anyone starting towards the back will struggle to move into pole position without a huge amount of luck. Indeed, tracks such as Monaco and Catalunya (the Spanish Grand Prix) are traditionally tough to overtake on and in recent years the winner has always started at the front of the grid.
However, if you're sizing up the prospects in a race where the track is much wider, then you should be more willing to consider drivers that are in form but further down on the grid. Although this isn't an exact science, the key thing to understand when you're betting on F1 is that different tracks suit different drivers.
 
Although races often go along with the form book (i.e. who performs best in qualifying), the conditions on the day, as well as a team's tactics, can have a huge influence on the outcome of a race. Therefore, if you're able to take in these variables, trawl through some stats and decide which drivers are best suited to the circuit, then you have a much better chance of making a profit when you ante-up.
 
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